22 March 2023 11:00AM-12:15PM In Person Water House, 666 3rd Avenue, New York
An Indigenous Traditional Dialogue on Water Ethics
Indigenous Peoples play a critical role in the preservation of natural resources, including water. They need and deserve support to continue this important work. The speakers in this event will communicate the nature of harm to the waterways that are connected to and within their territories, relating anecdotal and lived...
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Indigenous Peoples play a critical role in the preservation of natural resources, including water. They need and deserve support to continue this important work. The speakers in this event will communicate the nature of harm to the waterways that are connected to and within their territories, relating anecdotal and lived experiences.

The event will focus on demonstrating the Indigenous education process in imparting knowledge on traditional Indigenous water ethics. In doing so, the goal of this event is to share information to ensure the survival of Indigenous cultures by strengthening customary rules and protocols for protecting nature and waterways, strengthening legal protections for Indigenous Peoples, and advocating for inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in conservation efforts.

Program overview:

There will be an opening water song, several speakers, and a presentation of the Indigenous Peoples Water Declaration, along with recommendations and commitments offered to the UNWC.

About Indigenous Environmental Network:

Established in 1990 within the United States, IEN was formed by grassroots Indigenous peoples and individuals to address environmental and economic justice issues (EJ). IEN’s activities include building the capacity of Indigenous communities and tribal governments to develop mechanisms to protect our sacred sites, land, water, air, natural resources, health of both our people and all living things, and to build economically sustainable communities.

For more information, please see our website and Facebook page